Salad with microgreens

Microgreens: All You Ever Wanted to Know

Since their introduction to the Californian restaurant scene in the 1980s, microgreens have steadily gained popularity.

These aromatic greens, also known as micro herbs or vegetable confetti, are rich in flavor and add a welcome splash of color to a variety of dishes.

Despite their small size, they pack a nutritional punch, often containing higher nutrient levels than more mature vegetable greens. This makes them a good addition to any diet.

What are Microgreens?

Microgreens means micro + green, literally, which means the seedling version of a plant. Microgreens is an intermediate stage between sprouts and baby greens. Sprouts are 2 to 5days old, micro greens are 7 to 14 days old, while baby greens are 3 to 4 weeks old.

Sprouts

Microgreens

Baby Greens

80% adolescents in India have a deficiency of micro nutrients. Let not your family suffer from the “hidden hunger”. Microgreens contain upto 40 times the nutrition found in their mature counterparts.

You must have seen microgreens as garnishings on gourmet food dishes. But they are much more than a pretty decoration on your plate. These herbs are, in fact, nutrient bombs that we need to include in our diet on a regular basis. 80 percent of adolescents in India are deficient in iron, vitamin A, vitamin B12, vitamin D or zinc.

Microgreens pack a nutritional punch

Their vibrancy and delicateness make for an obvious choice in terms of visual appeal, giving dishes that necessary pop. But these pretty little things are also, though miniscule in size, concentrated in nutrients.

Studies have shown that micro greens are loaded with nutrients, such as vitamins C, E and K, lutein and beta-carotene, 40 fold than the mature leaves of the same plants.

Like its full-grown counterparts, the levels of these nutrients vary across the wide array of microgreens. Of course, mature vegetables could never be replaced, providing you with the necessary fiber that your body needs, but micro greens fill in all of the other gaps in your dietary needs.

living microgreens

 Health Benefits

Eating vegetables is linked to a lower risk of many diseases.

This is likely thanks to the high amounts of vitamins, minerals and beneficial plant compounds they contain.

Micro-greens contain similar and often greater amounts of these nutrients than mature greens. As such, they may similarly reduce the risk of the following diseases:

  • Heart disease: Micro-greens are a rich source of polyphenols, a class of antioxidants linked to a lower risk of heart disease. Animal studies show that microgreens may lower triglyceride and “bad” LDL cholesterol levels
  • Alzheimer’s disease: Antioxidant-rich foods, including those containing high amounts of polyphenols,may be linked to a lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease
  • Diabetes: Antioxidants may help reduce the type of stress that can prevent sugar from properly entering cells. In lab studies, fenugreek micro-greens appeared to enhance cellular sugar uptake by 25–44% 
  • Certain cancers: Antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables, especially those rich in polyphenols, may lower the risk of various types of cancer. Polyphenol-rich micro-greens may be expected to have similar effects 

HOW TO INCLUDE MICROGREENS IN YOUR DIET

Microgreens garnishing on pizza
There are many ways to include microgreens in your diet.
They can be incorporated into a variety of dishes, including sandwiches, wraps and salads.
Microgreens may also be blended into smoothies or juiced. Wheatgrass juice is a popular example of a juiced microgreen.
Another option is to use them as garnishes on pizzas, soups, omelets, curries and other warm dishes.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *